Flu epidemics, pandemics & outbreaks

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Description or Situation

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Overview

Despite the commonality of colds and flu's across the land there is a growing concern for what the future holds for humanity. Colds and flu's have typically been thought of as something that comes and goes with causing much collateral damage. Many people move forward with our lives with the understanding that all is well with preventing or eliminating the few flu's and colds which exist here on Earth. Early education depicts that we as a species will inevitably cure all sicknesses. Perhaps some day that will be the case but now days we seem to be encountering more variations of flu like illnesses. Conspiracy theorists hypothesize that new strains are being created every years adding to the potential for an epidemic, pandemic or outbreak. What's more is that these synthetic flu's are far more reactive to human environments and far more deadly. The flip side of creating deadly flu's is equally concerning when it comes to vaccines. Many people refuse to be vaccinated as they believe the vaccine itself may be more deadly than the illness and it may inhibit or alter reactions associated with the human immune system. Are flu like illnesses being stored for potential weaponizing? Are vaccines the real concern? Is it possible for humanity to experience a zombie type environment? Are you at risk? These questions deserve consideration and answers. The following information has been provided to assist those searching to enlighten and validate those concerns.

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The following is intended to aid those seeking information associated with the effects of Flu epidemics, pandemics and the consequences of an outbreak.

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What is a "Flu"?

Flu is an infectious disease from birds and mammals caused by RNA viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae, the influenza viruses.  The "Flu" is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system .... your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as the stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting. Variations of sub category type flu's seem to enter Earths environment often showing up on steroids. Mutations of previous strains are discovered more often than is perceived by the general population.

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There are three basic types of flu viruses, ... A, B, and C.

Type A and B cause the annual influenza epidemics that have up to 20% of the population sniffling, aching, coughing, and running high fevers. Type C also causes flu; however, type C flu symptoms are much less severe.The flu is linked to between 3,000 and 49,000 deaths and 200,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States. [Source]

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Type A flu:

Type "A" viruses are capable of infecting animals, although it is more common for people to suffer the ailments associated with this type of flu. Wild birds commonly act as the hosts for this flu virus.Type A flu virus is constantly changing and is generally responsible for the large flu epidemics. The influenza A2 virus (and other variants of influenza) is spread by people who are already infected. The most common flu hot spots are those surfaces that an infected person has touched and rooms where he has been recently, especially areas where he has been sneezing.

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Type B flu:

Type "B" virus is found only in humans. Type B flu may cause a less severe reaction than type A flu virus, but occasionally, type B flu can still be extremely harmful. Influenza type B viruses are not classified by sub-type and do not cause pandemics. [Source]

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Type C flu:

Type "C" viruses are also found in people. They are, however, milder than either type A or B. People generally do not become very ill from the influenza type C viruses. Type C flu viruses do not cause epidemics. [Source]

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Additional information on A,B & C type flu

Human flu, influenza caused by viruses endemic in human populations.
Avian flu, influenza caused by viruses adapted to birds.
Swine flu, influenza caused by viruses endemic in pigs.
Equine flu, influenza caused by viruses endemic in horses.
Dog flu, influenza occurring in canine animals.

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Other diseases with flu like attributes

  • Influenza-like illness, a medical diagnosis of possible influenza or other illness causing a set of common symptoms.
  • Stomach flu, also known as gastroenteritis.
  • Haemophilus influenzae, or H. flu, a bacterial infection which can cause respiratory infections and sepsis.
  • Cat flu, the common name for a feline upper respiratory tract disease.

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Influenza and its complications can be deadly. People at higher risk of developing flu complications include

  • Young children
  • Adults older than 65
  • Pregnant women
  • People with weakened immune systems
  • People who have chronic illnesses

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  wikipedia

Read more on Influenza type flu

 

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What causes a flu? 

 

Catching or spreading flu viruses are as simple as it gets. Flu viruses enter the body through the mucus membranes of your nose, eyes, or mouth. Every time you touch your hand to one of these areas, you are possibly infecting yourself with a virus. Most people don't think about the gas pump having a nasty virus on it. How about those buttons we push on ATM machines etc. It probably wouldn't take much to infect an entire region or community if that were the intent. Many conspiracy theorists make claim that secret and convert labs can synthesis killer strains of flu virus to weaponize it against enemies. Yes, ... it is possible and most likely being done. Bio-technology has now grown to a point where we should all be concerned with who's doing what.

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Typical questions asked about catching the flu

Can kissing cause the flu?
No
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Most viral infections seep in through your nose and eyes, not your mouth. In fact, in a Journal of Infectious Diseases study, only 8 percent of people fell sick after smooching someone who had a cold. "It's actually safer to kiss someone who's sick than shake his hand," says microbiologist Charles Gerba, Ph.D.

Can staying in a hotel room cause the flu?
Yes!!!

A third of hotel room surfaces were still coated in germs nearly a full day after a sick person spent the night, says research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Protect yourself by swabbing hard surfaces like doorknobs, light switches, and remote controls with hand sanitizer or alcohol-based wipes.

Can using an old toothbrush cause the flu?
No!!!

No need to toss your toothbrush after recovering from a cold or flu—you can't reinfect yourself. When you fall ill, your immune system creates antibodies specific to the strain of virus you have. Those good guys stick around to make sure you never get the same exact virus again, says Josh Miller, D.O.

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 Capture 3   More information here ....

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The video below gives a clear illustration of what happens when someone nearby you sneezes... and you end up inhaling the virus. It's said that a single sneeze may produce up to 40,000 droplets, which may leave your mouth at speeds of more than 200 miles per hour.1 While some of the heavier droplets will fall to the floor, others remain airborne and are quickly circulated around the room. If the droplet is infected with a virus, and you inhale it, the video shows how a single virus can quickly begin producing millions of copies within your cells. It's a frightening prospect, until you realize that your body has more than 1 trillion cells – making 1 million viruses a mere drop in the bucket. [Source].

 

Scientist creates new flu virus that can kill all of humanity

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What is a flu epidemic?

An epidemic occurs when an infectious disease spreads rapidly to many people. In 2003, the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic took the lives of nearly 800 people worldwide. [Source].

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What is a flu pandemic?

A pandemic is a global disease outbreak. HIV/AIDS is an example of one of the most destructive global pandemics in history. Influenza pandemics have occurred more than once. [Source].

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What is an outbreak?

A disease outbreak happens when a disease occurs in greater numbers than expected in a community or region or during a season. An outbreak may occur in one community or even extend to several countries. It can last from days to years. Sometimes a single case of a contagious disease is considered an outbreak. This may be true if it is an unknown disease, is new to a community, or has been absent from a population for a long time.

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Historical flu's

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Pandemic Flu History

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Flu pandemics have occurred throughout history. There have been four since 1918, each with different characteristics.

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1918 – 1919

Illness from the 1918 flu pandemic, also known as the Spanish flu, came on quickly. Some people felt fine in the morning but died by nightfall. People who caught the Spanish Flu but did not die from it often died from complications caused by bacteria, such as pneumonia.

During the 1918 pandemic:

  • Approximately 20% to 40% of the worldwide population became ill
  • An estimated 50 million people died
  • Nearly 675,000 people died in the United States

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Unlike earlier pandemics and seasonal flu outbreaks, the 1918 pandemic flu saw high mortality rates among healthy adults. In fact, the illness and mortality rates were highest among adults 20 to 50 years old. The reasons for this remain unknown.

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1957 – 1958

In February 1957, a new flu virus was identified in the Far East. Immunity to this strain was rare in people younger than 65. A pandemic was predicted. To prepare, health officials closely monitored flu outbreaks. Vaccine production began in late May 1957 and was available in limited supply by August 1957.

In the summer of 1957, the virus came to the United States quietly with a series of small outbreaks. When children returned to school in the fall, they spread the disease in classrooms and brought it home to their families. Infection rates peaked among school children, young adults, and pregnant women in October 1957. By December 1957, the worst seemed to be over.

However, another wave of illness came in January and February of 1958. This is an example of the potential "second wave" of infections that can happen during a pandemic.

Most influenza–and pneumonia–related deaths occurred between September 1957 and March 1958. Although the 1957 pandemic was not as devastating as the 1918 pandemic, about 69,800 people in the United States died. The elderly had the highest rates of death.

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1968 – 1969

In early 1968, a new flu virus was detected in Hong Kong. The first cases in the United States were detected as early as September 1968. Illness was not widespread in the United States until December 1968. Deaths from this virus peaked in December 1968 and January 1969. Those over the age of 65 were most likely to die. The number of deaths between September 1968 and March 1969 was 33,800, making it the mildest flu pandemic in the 20th century. The same virus returned in 1970 and 1972.

There could be several reasons fewer people in the United States died due to this virus:

  • The Hong Kong flu virus was similar in some ways to the 1957 pandemic flu virus. This might have provided some immunity against the Hong Kong flu virus.
  • The Hong Kong flu virus hit in December of 1968, when school children were on vacation. This caused a decline in flu cases because children were not at school to infect one another. This also prevented it from spreading into their homes.
  • Improved medical care and antibiotics that are more effective for secondary bacterial infections were available for those who became ill.

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2009 – 2010

In the spring of 2009, a new flu virus spread quickly across the United States and the world. The first U.S. case of H1N1 (swine flu) was diagnosed on April 15, 2009. By April 21, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was working to develop a vaccine for this new virus. On April 26, the U.S. government declared H1N1 a public health emergency.

By June, 18,000 cases of H1N1 had been reported in the United States. A total of 74 countries were affected by the pandemic. H1N1 vaccine supply was limited in the beginning. People at the highest risk of complications got the vaccine first.

By November 2009, 48 states had reported cases of H1N1, mostly in young people. That same month, over 61 million vaccine doses were ready. Reports of flu activity began to decline in parts of the country, which gave the medical community a chance to vaccinate more people. 80 million people were vaccinated against H1N1, which minimized the impact of the illness.

The CDC estimates that 43 million to 89 million people had H1N1 between April 2009 and April 2010. They estimate between 8,870 and 18,300 H1N1 related deaths.

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On August 10, 2010 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared an end to the global H1N1 flu pandemic.

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Pandemic Flu Threats

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1976

When the 1976 swine flu was identified at Fort Dix, New Jersey it was called the "killer flu." Experts were concerned because they thought the virus was similar to the 1918 Spanish flu.

To prevent a major pandemic, the United States launched a vaccination campaign. In fact, the virus––later named "swine flu"––never moved outside the Fort Dix area. Later, research on the virus showed that it would not have been as deadly as the 1918 flu if it had spread.

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1977

In May 1977, a new flu virus was found in northern China. The virus spread quickly and became a worldwide  epidemic in people under 23. Because the virus was similar to flu viruses found before 1957, people born before 1957 had been exposed to it and had some immunity.

By January 1978, the virus had spread around the world, including the United States. This outbreak was not considered a pandemic because most patients were children. To prevent future outbreaks, the virus was included in the 1978–1979 vaccine.

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1997 and 1999

In 1997, at least a few hundred people caught H5N1 (avian flu) in Hong Kong. Like the 1918 pandemic, most severe illness affected young adults. Eighteen people were hospitalized. Six of those people died. This avian flu was unlike other viruses because it passed directly from chickens to people. Avian flu viruses usually spread from chickens to pigs before passing to humans.

To prevent the virus from spreading, all chickens in Hong Kong—approximately 1.5 million— were slaughtered. Because this flu did not spread easily from person to person, no human infections were found after the chickens were killed.

In 1999, a new avian flu virus appeared. The new virus caused illness in two children in Hong Kong.

Neither of these avian flu viruses started pandemics.

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Capture 3   Go here for alternate historical flu information ....

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Videos

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  Find  "solutions to flu epidemics, pandemics

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References

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0510/feature1/

http://www.healthline.com/health/cold-flu/deadly-flu#1

http://www.flu.gov/symptoms-treatment/symptoms/

http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/flu-guide/advanced-reading-types-of-flu-viruses

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