Survive chemical emergencies

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Solution

Increasing the odds to survive a Chemical emergency

 The description of  “Chemical emergency” can be found under “Why be prepared”.

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Prelude

 During the last few recent years factions of the US government have been providing funding to schools, hospitals, law enforcement agencies and other emergency services for the purpose of acquiring extensive emergency supplies. Those supplies and the assistance provided is done so with specific prime directives and expectations as to how and what to prepare for. Many of the items on the list of requirements include high level chemical and bio-hazard suits, decontamination tents and mass casualty trailers, (portable morgue) etc. In addition to these items are food supplies, generators and fuel, ... enough to last for a week, ... all of which has been mandated by The Department of Homeland Security, (DHS). What do they know that most people don't? Is there something on the horizon to be concerned with. Preparations are occurring and still in progress for a number of potential disasters, ... some of which are biological and chemical in nature. The activities mentioned here are hints and a validation that preparing is not only wise but necessary due to a reasonable speculation resulting from the evidence associated with governmental preparations. It is better to be prepared and self reliant, ... just in case.

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The following is intended to assist those seeking information associated with surviving chemical emergencies.

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d [ Emergency contacts for chemical exposure ]

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[ MSDS Emergency Phone Number ]

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Helpful hints for decreasing exposure to toxic chemicals, (Safe practices).

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At home:images Of course keeping toxic chemical compounds out of reach of children is expected. Plastic tub type containers are great for storing your cleaning supply's. This prevents a leaking container or spill from moving beyond the container itself. Lockable type containers are even better. They keep the kids and animals out of danger. Be aware of storing chemicals that do not belong together. This has the potential to create toxic fumes. As with the inside of our homes the garage and shed is also a place where toxic chemicals can be found. Exposure to many of these chemicals can cause burns, loss of breath, blindness, dizziness and severe skin irritation. Accidental mixing of these toxic chemicals can create fires or explosions. If you or some you know has been exposed to toxic chemicals from home and require immediate treatment get to a healthcare facility as quickly as possible. Until an incident occurs it is advantageous to know your resources. Additional thoughts to consider is to alleviate toxic chemicals in the home altogether. Try switching to non toxic brands.

Go here for casual treatment advice:

http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/

Does hydrogen peroxide induce vomiting in humans?  ..... Yes it can.

Anyone considering the use of diluted hydrogen peroxide as a method to induce vomiting should consult with a doctor or poison control services for application information.

From the Material safety data sheet (MSDS )for H2O2

Quote: Ingestion>
May cause severe digestive tract irritation with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting

Go here to learn more about treatment for children:

http://www.healthychildren.org/English/news/Pages/Tips-for-Poison-Prevention-and-Treatment.aspx

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/112/5/1182.full

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localized in the neighborhood:index A chemical accident is reported in the United States an average of 21 times a day. One in twenty of the chemical accidents that occurred in the United States resulted in immediate injuries, evacuations or deaths. Anhydrous ammonia, chlorine, sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and hydrochloric acid were the chemicals most frequently involved in accidents with immediate injury, evacuation, and death. The question for most survival minded people is "Should I Bug out or hunker down and stay"? That can only be determined once the seriousness of the spill or release can be ascertained. If bugging out is the option be sure to grab your survival kits and be prepared to stay away from the home for some time. Residual effects of the release may prevent returning to the home for many days.

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Accidents happen:

Toxic Chemical Accident Patterns in the United States, December 1996, by United States Public Interest Research Group and the National Environmental Law Center.

Since human beings and industrial processes are prone to fail, toxic accidents will continue to occur until industrial processes are redesigned to be inherently safer and involve less toxic materials.

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You have a right to know what kinds of chemicals are in or around your neighborhood. The Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, called EPCRA is the leagal platform in the US for obtaining the appropriate information. [source]. [EPCRA definition].

Safety Tips for Chemical Emergencies in your neighborhood.

http://www.lexingtonky.gov/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=5492

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Regional large scale: indexThe advice presented by the CDC recommends that people evacuate the area where a large scale chemical spill has occurred. Gases from an unknown chemical agent can migrate to your front door undetected. Have a bug out plan. Understanding, Preparation & Planning is key. Go here for more from the CDC.

http://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/

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Spills at work: index First, you need to learn all you can about the chemicals used and stored in your work area. What are the hazards? What would happen if the chemical were exposed to air, oxygen, a spark, water or even motion? Is the chemical corrosive, causing burns to human tissue? If breathed in, could it damage the respiratory system, cause unconsciousness or death? Are there possible long-term effects from chemical exposure, such as cancer? You can find this type of information from your Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), container label and online source.

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Here are some basic procedures you can learn for dealing with a spill. Be sure to get the correct steps for the specific chemicals you are dealing with.

Find that information in the MSDS

  • Alert people in the area of the spill.
  • Call the appropriate emergency numbers, which should be posted at each telephone.
  • Attend to any injured persons, removing them from exposure and getting to a safety shower if necessary.
  • Depending on the nature of the chemical, you might need to open windows and doors to provide ventilation, close up the affected area to contain spills or turn off heat and other ignition sources.
  • If you are trained and authorized, use the appropriate materials to absorb or contain the spill. For instance, you might have kits to neutralize spilled acids or bases. For other chemicals, you could be required to sprinkle an absorbent litter on a spill, or surround the spill with a dam.

Do not attempt cleanup under these circumstances:

  • The spill is too large.
  • The spill is highly toxic.
  • You don’t have the necessary protection or the right equipment to do the job.
  • ’t know what the spilled material is.
  • You feel symptoms of exposure.

Learn your part in the spill response plan for your department. If there is no such plan, ask your supervisor to work with the management and safety department in establishing one. Go to this source for more. [source] Note: Primary source of contact should be the local fire department.

 

 

Protecting your home and your family should be at the top of your emergency preparedness list. Storing clean drinking water and making a few grab-and-go preparedness kits, (bug out bag), is a great place to start. Items that have been known to be helpful during a chemical emergency or disaster are listed for the consideration of those who wish to have an advantage during such a calamity.

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Things to have:

Gas masks and filters

Chemical suit with hood

Spill kit

First aid or med kit

bug out bag

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Things to do:

  • Find higher ground
    Go outside if a chemical weapon has been released inside of the building you are in. If chemicals are discharged into the open air go to higher ground. Substances such as Sarin are denser than air which means they are going to sink low to the ground.
  • Change clothes
    Substances will cling to clothing. It is very important to change the affected areas of your clothing as fast as you can.
  • Keep your hands clean and avoid touching your eyes.
    Wash your skin with soap and water, or hand sanitizer. If your eyes burn, rinse them with just water for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Keep calm
    Panicking causes rash decisions, increase inhalation and a potential for quicker physiological reaction to the exposure. Panic also spreads like wildfire - the more folks that become agitated, the worse off you will be. So, stay calm!
  • Have a plan: Whether it is a mistake or intentional, having a disaster preparedness plan for hazardous chemical mishaps may mean the difference between life and death. Use the tools outlined on this portal to create your plan for chemical emergencies and go over it with your family as soon as possible!
    Don’t wait until it is too late.
    Be prepared to survive

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List of household chemicals that are harmful.
http://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/healthy_living/hic_Household_Chemicals_The_Basics/hic_Household_Chemicals_Chart_Whats_in_my_House

List of industrial chemicals that are harmful.
https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/emergencypreparedness/guides/chemical.html

First aid for chemical exposure http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/chemicals/firstaid.html

 

 

Video instruction for the purpose of treating others

 

Go here to You Tube for the entire series.

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Cigarette smoke

Processed tobacco products such as cigarettes have enough toxicity to be harmful to human health both directly and indirectly. The effects are subtle and gradual but deadly none the less. Cigarette smoke contains a toxic mix of more than 7,000 chemicals.1 Many of these are found in other products, too... like embalming fluid. Find out about the toxic mix of chemicals in tobacco smoke here. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_additives_in_cigarettes & http://therealcost.betobaccofree.hhs.gov/?gclid=CNXlmfj7tsMCFYFufgodxSkA1g

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References:

http://www.msdscompliance.com/data/msds_emergency_phone_number_37.html

https://chemm.nlm.nih.gov/emergencycontacts.htm

http://www.chemicalspill.org/ChemicalsWorkPlace/types1.htmlhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_accident

The Environmental Working Group. Cleaning Supplies and Your Health Accessed 3/4/2014.

National Institutes of Health. National Library of Medicine. Household Products Database: Health and Safety Information on Household Products Accessed 3/4/2014.

FEMA/Ready.gov. Household Chemical Emergencies Accessed 3/4/2014.

http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centers_for_Disease_Control_and_Prevention

http://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/

http://chemistry.about.com/od/healthsafety/a/dangerous-household-chemicals.htm

For pesticide poisoning, call 911 if the person is unconscious, has trouble breathing, or has convulsions. Otherwise, call Poison Control at 1-800-222-1222.

chemical emergencies