Survive drought

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Solution

Increasing the odds to survive a Drought

The description of  “Drought” can be found under “Why be prepared”.

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Prelude

Droughts are often not taken too seriously by most people who have grown accustomed to looking no further than a faucet or supplied spout to get the water they want or need. It is only after the water stops running that it captures our full attention and by then it may be too late. Especially for those who lack secondary supplies or methods for acquiring water. Because water is one of the most important resources humans require in order to survive consideration and preparations should rank very high for survival minded enthusiasts. With some research, education, training and preparation times of drought can be managed in such a way that permits the continuance for the circle of life. This means that proactive measures can result in adequate hydration for plants, animals and humans alike with the aim of getting past a duration of dryer seasons with the understanding that it will come to pass. Ancient writings, ... Such as in the Bible, ... depict times of drought which were cyclic in nature. Those who prepared appropriately survived these events while those who failed to consider the repercussions suffered or perished. Plan accordingly, ... just in case, ... and survive drought.

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The following is intended to aid those seeking information conducive for surviving drought.

 

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Capturing the rain

Collecting rain water in containers from places around your home or property presents a huge advantage during and prior to drought conditions. Make use of this water for washing cars or irrigating lawns and gardens. Rain water can be stored in larger containers such as tanks and barrels. You can elevate larger containers in such a way that produces pressure to a delivery point from being gravity fed. In addition to storage a tower can also be used to catch rain water. Ensure that your tank has a removable top as well as a filtered cover to keep debris out. In desperate times captured rain water can be used for consumption.

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Recycle water

What water? .... all of it?  Sounds like an unappealing task to capture used water until the day when we need it and don't have it. During time of drought it may be necessary to recycle the majority of the water you use. During this time it is important to change how you clean eating utensils as well the water you wash with. Using non-toxic cleaning and personal care products should be consider to avoid unwanted effects of contaminants. The less the water we pollute, the easier it is to clean and reuse it. There are many ways to filter or clean dirty water for reuse such as building your own water filtration system out of household items or extracting water through a process involving evaporation. This site offers resources for various water filtering products.

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Keep back-up water supplies

Storing water in case of emergencies is just plain smart. It doesn't take much effort to stash a little water here and there. Note the following: Be sure to rotate your water storage containers every 4 to 6 months depending on what material the containers are made of. Some containers store water better than others simply meaning that certain materials tend to give off a residue into the water like milk cartons. Use the old water to irrigate plants etc.

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Conserve water

One third of water used in most households goes to flushing toilets. You can now purchase products that will recycle sink and bath water for the use of flushing toilets. Other innovative products which save water turns technology to the task of cleaning and conserving our resources. Use less and recycle your water for better efficiency.

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Hydroponic gardening during a drought

Hydroponic gardening is simple, inexpensive and solves a number of the typical issues associated with food production. More food can be grown in a shorter period of time. Food can be grown in areas that do not commonly support agriculture due to climate or soil content. Hydroponics systems require only around 10 percent of the water that soil-based agriculture requires. This is due to the fact that hydroponic systems allow recycling and reuse of water and nutrient solutions, and the fact that no water is wasted. [More on Hydroponics here]

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Water rights on property

Owning property has it's degree of benefits especially when it comes to tapping into indigenous water resources located on or beneath your land. If you or someone you know owns property with ponds, lakes or streams than check with your local laws regarding the rights you have when it comes to the water on or passing through it. This includes the water under the property as well.  Curious? Get more here. [Information on water rights go to this reference]

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Check faucets and pipes for leaks

A leaky faucet that drips at the rate of one drip per second can waste more than 3,000 gallons per year. That's the amount of water needed to take more than 180 showers! Ten percent of homes have leaks that waste 90 gallons or more per day. The average household's leaks can account for more than 10,000 gallons of water wasted every year, or the amount of water needed to wash 270 loads of laundry. Want more enlightening information on water leaks?  [Try this reference here] 

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Using ocean salt water

Salt water is desalinated to produce fresh water suitable for human consumption or irrigation. Make a distillation process to turn salty ocean water into drinking water. Here are a couple of ways to do that. [Reference 1] & [Reference 2] 

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Atmospheric water generation

An atmospheric water generator (AWG), is a device that extracts water from humid ambient air. There are systems you buy or devices you can build yourself using household items which extract water from the air. It is a slow process that does require humidity but works. [Go here to watch a video presentation.]

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Extracting water from down under

Locate underground water sources with a method that has been around for a very long time using what is called divining rods. This method is called "Dowsing". Watch this video reference below to gain a better idea on finding water underground with the use of divining rods .

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References:

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dowsing

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_right

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desalination

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dehydration

http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/pubs/fixleak.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_water_generator

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-many-days-can-you-survive-without-water-2014-5

http://drought.unl.edu/droughtforkids/howdoesdroughtaffectourlives/typesofdroughtimpacts.aspx

http://home.howstuffworks.com/lawn-garden/professional-landscaping/alternative-methods/hydroponics2.htm

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