Survive landslides, Mud drifts & Sinkholes

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Solution

Increasing the odds of surviving landslides, mud drifts & sink holes

The description for "Landslides, mud drifts & sinkholes" can be found under "Why be prepared"

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Prelude

Surviving a landslide or similar event means to have a general preparedness for any such occurrence where the ground beneath our feet becomes unstable and mobile. As mentioned in the descriptions of a land or mud slide these events are often triggered by volcanic or geological adjustments. A general preparedness means to expect road closures, power failures and a lack of available resources all of which should be prepared for accordingly. Going deeper into the specifics of this subject encompasses an array of solutions applicable to preventative measures for a variation of landslides and suggested actions to consider when caught off guard during an event. The odds of perishing in such an event are variable depending on the region. The Earth continues to reshape itself as the overall population grows expanding  into new territories with roads and cities. It is reasonable to accommodate for additional occurrences as we disturb and reconfigure the landscape with tunnels, reservoirs, roads and buildings. Despite the marvels of modern engineering we are still subject to the continuing effects associated with geological adjustments. It is advantageous to enhance our chances in surviving any such calamity or disaster. Awareness and self reliance is key.

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The following information is intended to assist those seeking solutions to surviving landslides, mud drifts and sink holes.

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Report a landslide

 

 

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Preventative measures

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Living and working in higher risk areas

Most all survival minded enthusiasts tend to focus in on a having a degree of self reliance. A purposeful disconnect from the dependency of others which promotes continuance of life for our selves and those we love and care about. This means to be highly resourceful and possess applicable skills known to be conducive for surviving an array of disasters and calamities. It also means that possessing a degree of knowledge regarding escape routes such as back roads and trails encourages familiarity with geological intricacies.

It is advantageous and often surprising when looking deeper into the area in which we live just as well as understanding risks along routes of travel. Many people live throughout their lives unaware of potential risks and vulnerabilities associated with their immediate region. Taking a proactive approach in avoiding a landslide or other  movement of earth means to increase our awareness for geological conditions and circumstances  specific to our immediate area.

Threatening geological conditions can be obvious such as with the results and effects from previous events and can offer a degree of clues that add up to projected risks for the future. For instance, ... living in mountainous regions which have clear signs of land movement and experience frequent earthquakes may be prone to additional events.. The culmination of these circumstances added to sparse vegetation and ground cover present an even higher level of risk for landslides. Mud slides and drifts are very likely to occur for those lower lying areas below the previously described. Loose land and mud flow down hill most often taking out everything in its path. Mud drifts are slow and encompassing such as with volcanic lava flows but a flash flood from a higher region can be disastrous in it's unexpected spontaneity. Less obvious signs for potential geological adjustments can be seen right under our nose but are most often ignored. Side walks, roads and buildings also present an array of clues that can equivalate to an impending event.

If the region in which we live and work is under frequent repairs to roads, sidewalks and buildings it may be assumed that ground movement for the area may be higher than desired. For the most part, ... many of us understand the risks associated with the areas in which we live, work and commute. For curious individuals with a mindset to be prepared  awareness and exposure brings fourth concern and prompt additional research. How do we research geological facts about our own regions? See additional resources below.

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Landslide Hazards Program

landslide map images

Geological Maps

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Informative maps as such may be helpful to consult and study prior to purchasing a home, ... just to be certain.  A risk assessment is smart and proactive.

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Before a Landslide

Provided by Ready.gov

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Traveling through areas of risk

Despite higher levels of confidence while driving our vehicles we are still subject to risks which are out of our control. Commuters are typically familiar with geological terrain and intricacies associated with signs of risk however unfamiliar territory can present unforeseen circumstances that can result in unfortunate accidents. Planning ahead to some degree is advantageous for traveling through those areas. For instance, ... Many travelers who do not reside in a heavily populated city to be traveled through still understand that traffic and congestion in that city may cause unwanted delays. As a result they will have performed a degree of homework and research to discover an appropriate time to travel through that area or find an alternate route. The same apples for weather and geological intricacies which may occur or plague an area to be traveled through.

Traveling through an area with steep bare mountains comprised of sedimentary and loose soil during a rain storm imply a heavier degree of risk. Awareness and a little education can make the difference between safe travels and being caught unexpectedly in a chaotic situation. Those who ride share with others can benefit from a proactive and suggestive demeanor if subject to becoming a passenger in someone else s vehicle. It's OK to voice opinions when alarmed or concerned, ... especially if you possess knowledge of a potential situation. If traveling requires the use of public transportation or other method of mass transit such as with a train it is prudent to carry a small array of survival gear or goods in a carry bag, ... just in case of unexpected chaos standing between you and surviving.

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Applicable levels of preparation

Basic preparations applicable for most disasters and calamities consists of a few things but is subject to change based on the desired level of preparedness.

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First level of preparedness  ⇒   Primary resources and supplies consisting of food and water for between 3 days and 2 weeks, ..."per person and pet".  It also means to carry an emergency "bug out" bag with a smaller version of supplies tucked away in a vehicle. Some form of communication, (cell phone), which is not dependent upon local utility services, ... just in case those services are cut off.  A few maps to cover potential escape routes and a first aid kit are also a part of this level of preparedness but not much more.

Secondary levels of preparedness  ⇒    Covers the above mentioned but with enhancements.  More of those resources to cover a longer period of time increases the odds for survival. Added to this level of preparedness are defensive measures for detouring malicious intent by others. Communications often extend into the use of CB radios. Escape vehicles are tough and have off road advantageous to support a rural bug out plan.

Third level of preparedness  ⇒   Encompasses all the attributes of the previous but with emphasis on true self reliance. This means to have acquired a degree of knowledge and skills which promotes  higher chances of sustaining life for extended periods of time. Knowing how to utilize local and natural resources such as plants and vegetation for food and medicine are a part of this level. This level also includes advanced methods of finding and extracting water from unsuspecting areas. Communications are enhanced to cover a wide range of tools. Shortwave radios with multiple frequency options and satellite phones are often used at this level of preparedness. Additional items at this level include but are not limited to gas personal protection equipment such as a bio-hazard suit and gas masks and enhanced holistic knowledge. This level of preparedness means to become as self reliant as possible after the supplies have run out. Extensive preparations typically go into the home at this level. For those level 3 type survivalist who live in areas of risk for landslides and mudslides it is expected to have structurally reinforced the home and created a safe room of sorts. Seismic alarms are not beyond considering at this level. The success of survival often depends upon a few seconds of warning.

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CDC 1Emergency Preparedness and Response for landslides

 

 

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Caught in an event

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While at home or work

While outside of a structure additional warning is typically available due to obvious combinations related to sight, sound and direction all of which can provide those caught in the path to act quicker. being indoors have all the characteristics associated with being caught off guard. Sight and direction are often unavailable leaving nothing more than the sound of earth flowing and crashing into anything in its path. Be attentive to strange and abnormal sounds and vibrations. Set a purposeful trigger in your mind to act upon anything strange and out place. Grab whats most important and hold on to something solid or jump onto a couch. Furniture seems to float with flow if the structure collapses. If possible run laterally to the flow and get out of the path of destruction.

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While traveling

Staying inside the vehicle is an option worth considering since it does offer a degree of protection form falling debris as well as provide a potential method of flotation. Avoid traveling along roads with potential risk, ... such as with gorges and canyons during stormy weather if possible. Hold on to anything in the vehicle that is not tied down so as to prevent being struck by flying objects.

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Videos

Landslide survivor tells a story

How to survive a landslide

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References

http://landslides.usgs.gov/

http://www.ready.gov/landslides-debris-flow

http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/foodwater/prepare.asp

http://maps.redcross.org/website/maps/arc_map_links.html

landslides