Violent Crime

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Description or Situation

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Overview

Violent crimes can occur just about anywhere or to anyone. Anytime a crime is committed which involves harming, injuring, threatening or holding victims against their will it is typically considered a violent crime by legal standards. Other definitions of violence or crime is often at the discretion or opinion of the victims and depends upon the specific circumstances. Violent crimes are often committed locally or withing a region known to encourage such activity but is certainly not limited to these characteristics.

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The following is intended to aid those seeking information related to the aspects, effects and concerns associated being a victim of "violent crime".

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Elements of a violent crime

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Violence  »

Violence is defined by the World Health Organization as "the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, which either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, mal-development, or deprivation".  [Source]

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Crime  »

In ordinary language, the term crime denotes an unlawful act punishable by a state. The term "crime" does not, in modern criminal law, have any simple and universally accepted definition. The most popular view is that crime is a category created by law, in other words, something is a crime if declared as such by the relevant and applicable law. One proposed definition is that a crime or offense (or criminal offense) is an act harmful not only to some individual or individuals but also to a community, society or the state ("a public wrong"). Such acts are forbidden and punishable by law. While every crime violates the law, not every violation of the law counts as a crime. Breaches of private law (torts and breaches of contract) are not automatically punished by the state, but can be enforced through civil procedure.  [Source]

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The following has been provided with the intent to aid those seeking information related to violent crimes and the implications associated with such events.

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What is a violent crime?

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A violent crime or crime of violence is a crime in which an offender uses or threatens force upon a victim. This entails both crimes in which the violent act is the objective, such as murder, as well as crimes in which violence is the means to an end. Violent crimes may, or may not, be committed with weapons. Depending on the jurisdiction, violent crimes may vary from homicide to harassment.  [Source]

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Types of crime that can involve violence

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»  Aircraft hijackers 

Aircraft hijacking (also known as air piracy or aircraft piracy, especially within the special aircraft jurisdiction of the United States, and informally as skyjacking) is the unlawful seizure of an aircraft by an individual or a group. In most cases, the pilot is forced to fly according to the orders of the hijackers. Occasionally, however, the hijackers have flown the aircraft themselves, such as the September 11 attacks. In at least three cases, the plane was hijacked by the official pilot or co-pilot.

Unlike the typical hijackings of land vehicles or ships, skyjacking is not usually committed for robbery or theft. Most aircraft hijackers intend to use the passengers as hostages, either for monetary ransom or for some political or administrative concession by authorities. Various motives have driven such occurrences, including demanding the release of certain inmates (notably IC-814), highlighting the grievances of a particular community (notably AF 8969), or political asylum (notably ET 961). Hijackers also have used aircraft as a weapon to target particular locations (notably during the September 11, 2001 attacks).

Hijackings with hostages commonly produce an armed standoff during a period of negotiation between hijackers and authorities, followed by some form of settlement. Settlements do not always meet the hijackers' original demands. If the hijackers' demands are deemed too great and the perpetrators show no inclination to surrender, authorities sometimes employ armed special forces to attempt a rescue of the hostages. [Source]

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»  Bank robbers

Bank robbery is the crime of stealing from a bank while bank employees, and usually bystanders, are subjected to force, violence or the threat of violence.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program, robbery is "the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear." By contrast, burglary is defined as, "unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft." Bank robbery is therefore defined as entering a bank when it is open and obtaining money either by using force or the threat of force. Breaking into a bank when it is closed is burglary.  [Source]

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»  Burglars

Burglary (also called breaking and entering and sometimes housebreaking), is an unlawful entry into a building for the purposes of committing an offense. Usually that offense is theft, but most jurisdictions include others within the ambit of burglary. To engage in the act of burglary is to burgle (in British English) or to burglarize (in American English).  [Source]

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»  Terrorists

In its broadest sense, terrorism is any act designed to cause terror. In a narrower sense, terrorism can be understood to feature a political objective. The word terrorism is politically loaded and emotionally charged. A broad array of political organizations have practiced terrorism to further their objectives. It has been practiced by both right-wing and left-wing political parties, nationalist groups, religious groups, revolutionaries, and ruling governments. The symbolism of terrorism can exploit human fear to help achieve these goals.  [Source]

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»  Carjackers

The definition of Carjacking is summarized as the unlawful seizure of an automobile. A violent hijacking of the vehicle an it’s occupant(s). The scope of a carjacking generally starts with the intent to gain money or valuables from the occupants of the vehicle but is not limited to that outcome. The vehicle itself is often taken and the occupants forced to get out. In many cases the occupants are taken along with the vehicle which escalates the crime to kidnapping.  [Source] , [P2S]

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»  Rapists

Rape is a type of sexual assault usually involving sexual intercourse or other forms of sexual penetration perpetrated against a person without that person's consent. The act may be carried out by physical force, coercion, abuse of authority or against a person who is incapable of giving valid consent, such as one who is unconscious, incapacitated, has a intellectual disability or below the legal age of consent. The term rape is sometimes used interchangeably with the term sexual assault.  [Source]

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 » Kidnappers 

In criminal law, kidnapping is the unlawful taking away or transportation of a person against that person's will, usually to hold the person unlawfully. This may be done for ransom or in furtherance of another crime, or in connection with a child custody dispute. In some countries such as the United States a large number of child abductions arise after separation or divorce when one parent wishes to keep a child against the will of the other or against a court order. In these cases, some jurisdictions do not consider it kidnapping if the child, being competent, agrees.  [Source] , [P2S]

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»  Torturers

Torture (from the Latin tortus, “twisted") is the act of deliberately inflicting physical or psychological pain on an organism in order to fulfill some desire of the torturer or compel some action from the victim. Torture, by definition, is a knowing and intentional act; deeds which unknowingly or negligently inflict pain without a specific intent to do so are not typically considered torture (though many of the consequences may be the same).

Torture has been carried out or sanctioned by individuals, groups, and states throughout history from ancient times to modern day, and forms of torture can vary greatly in duration from only a few minutes to several days or even longer. Reasons for torture can include punishment, revenge, political re-education, deterrence, interrogation or coercion of the victim or a third party, or simply the sadistic gratification of those carrying out or observing the torture. The need to torture another is thought to be the result of internal psychological pressure in the psyche of the torturer.  [Source]

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»  Active shooters

"Active killer" or "active shooter" names a type of mass murder marked by rapidity, scale, randomness and often suicide as well. The phenomenon is exemplified by the 1999 Columbine High School massacre, the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting, the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, the 2014 shootings at Parliament Hill, Ottawa, the 2015 Umpqua Community College shooting, the 2015 San Bernardino shooting, and many others.

The United States Department of Homeland Security defines the active shooter as "an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area; in most cases, active shooters use firearms(s) [sic] and there is no pattern or method to their selection of victims." Most incidents occur at locations in which the killers find little impediment in pressing their attack. Locations are generally described as soft targets, that is, they carry limited security measures to protect members of the public. In most instances, shooters commit suicide, are shot by police, or surrender when confrontation with responding law enforcement becomes unavoidable. According to New York City Police Department (NYPD) statistics, 46 percent of active shooter incidents are ended by the application of force by police or security, 40 percent end in the shooter's suicide, 14 percent of the time the shooter surrenders or, in less than 1 percent of cases, the violence ends with the attacker fleeing. The term "active" emphasizes to notified authorities the urgency of situations which are "unpredictable and evolve quickly," and in which "immediate deployment of law enforcement is required to stop the shooting and mitigate harm to victims."  [Source]

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»  Murderers

Murder is the killing of another human being without justification or valid excuse, and it is especially the unlawful killing of another human being with malice aforethought. This state of mind may, depending upon the jurisdiction, distinguish murder from other forms of unlawful homicide, such as manslaughter.

Most societies, from ancient to modern, have considered murder a very serious crime deserving harsh punishment for purposes of retribution, deterrence, rehabilitation, or incapacitation. There are many reasons why murder has been criminalized, including its costs to society as well as being considered intrinsically wrong. For example, murder may be considered intrinsically wrong because it violates a right to life or is oppressive; murder may be costly to society by undermining law and order, by squandering potential accomplishments of the victims, by risking escalation of violence, or by spreading fear and grief.  [Source]

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»  Gangsters

A gangster is a criminal who is a member of a gang. Some gangs are considered to be part of organized crime. Gangsters are also called mobsters, a term derived from mob and the suffix -ster. Gangs provide a level of organization and resources that support much larger and more complex criminal transactions than an individual criminal could achieve. Gangsters have been active for many years in countries around the world.  [Source]

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»  Drug cartels

A drug cartel is any criminal organization with the intention of supplying drug trafficking operations. They range from loosely managed agreements among various drug traffickers to formalized commercial enterprises. The term was applied when the largest trafficking organizations reached an agreement to coordinate the production and distribution of cocaine. Since that agreement was broken up, drug cartels are no longer actually cartels, but the term stuck and it is now popularly used to refer to any criminal narcotics related organization, such as those in Afghanistan, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Burma, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Laos, Mexico, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Russia, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

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The basic structure of a drug cartel is as follows:

Falcons: (Spanish: Halcones): Considered the "eyes and ears" of the streets, the "falcons" are the lowest rank in any drug cartel. They are responsible for supervising and reporting the activities of the police, the military, and rival groups.

Hit-men: (Spanish: Sicarios): The armed group within the drug cartel, responsible for carrying out assassinations, kidnappings, thefts, extortion's, operating protection rackets, and defending their plaza (turf) from rival groups and the military.

Lieutenants: (Spanish: Lugartenientes): The second highest position in the drug cartel organization, responsible for supervising the hit-men and falcons within their own territory. They are allowed to carry out low-profile executions without permission from their bosses.

Drug lords: [*] (Spanish: Capos): The highest position in any drug cartel, responsible for supervising the entire drug industry, appointing territorial leaders, making alliances, and planning high-profile executions.

It is worth noting that there are other operating groups within the drug cartels. For example, the drug producers and suppliers,  although not considered in the basic structure, are critical operators of any drug cartel, along with the financiers and money launderers. In addition, the arms suppliers operate in a completely different circle,  and are technically not considered part of the cartel’s logistics.  [Source]

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What causes violent crime?

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Top 10 Factors Identified as Contributing to Violent Crime.

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1.  Gangs  82 %

2.  Drugs-Cocaine  67 %

3.  Poor parenting  63 %

4.  Juveniles / youth crime  80 %

5.  Increased availability of guns  55 %

6.  Economy / poverty / unemployment  74 %

7.  Impulsive violence / disrespect issues  74 %

8.  Release of offenders from correctional institutions  69 %

9.  Educational system-increasing dropout rates (not in top 10 last year)  36 %

10.  Reduced cooperation from witnesses / victims (not in top 10 last year)  37 %

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[Relative resources]

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⇓⇓⇓  More Statistics here  ⇓⇓⇓

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Videos

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[ What Are Violent Crimes? - Definition, Types & Examples ]

[ Crimes Against Persons: Definition & Examples ]

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  Find "Solutions to violent crime"

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References

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rape

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torture

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burglary

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangster

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrorism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidnapping

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_cartel

http://beprepared2survive.com/car-jacking/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violent_crime

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_robbery

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_shooter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_hijacking

http://law.jrank.org/pages/12004/Causes-Crime.html

http://www.crimeinamerica.net/2011/02/22/top-10-factors-contributing-to-violent-crime/

Crime